Lendl’s Rehab Influence Pays the Biggest Dividends for Murray…

At first watch, Andy Murray’s superb dismantling of Milos Raonic in the Wimbledon final may have looked like a simple case of too much speed, too much craft, and too much defence for the big Canadian…Together, this combination certainly played a major role in Murray claiming his 2nd Wimbledon title…Slowly but surely building pressure that took its toll in the form of incredible Murray returning and passing + uncharacteristic Raonic errors (especially in the tie-breaks which he often dominates.)

LONDON, ENGLAND - JULY 10:  Andy Murray of Great Britain celebrates victory during the Men's Singles Final against Milos Raonic of Canada on day thirteen of the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championships at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club on July 10, 2016 in London, England.  (Photo by Clive Brunskill/Getty Images)

But behind this storyline lay a subtle sub-plot directed by Ivan Lendl…

Throughout his career Murray’s biggest achilles heel, along with his second serve, has been an addiction to self/support team abuse.

While I explained my opinion of this process in great detail when describing Murray’s mental capitulation against Djokovic in last year’s Australian Open final, I will review briefly again here before discussing how Murray’s renewed improvement in this area was a vital element in his victory…

A Simple, Time Effective Way to Develop Your Players’ Self-Awareness…

One of the most common barriers to mental toughness occurs when players become ‘caught up’ in unintentional difficult internal experiences like nerves and frustration and consequently begin taking actions based on these experiences.

To overcome this barrier players must first recognise that their actions have become dominated by these experiences…

The required skill here is self-awareness..

In this video from the Australian Open Coaches Conference I discuss the most common difficult internal experiences that players become caught up in and introduce you to a simple activity that you can do with your players to begin to enhance both their concentration and self-awareness…

Developing Player Mental Toughness: Our Most Common Mistake…

Setting high expectations and standards for players is a crucial component of any optimal developmental culture because these foundations promote quality practice environments and player self-belief. But it’s vital to match these expectations and the related challenges we set players with their ability to meet them. While some people may believe that lacking these expectations and standards as coaches (of developing players) is the most common missing ingredient to player success I beg to differ…

Most Common Coaching Mistake

In my experience, the most common mistake we make as developmental coaches is in fact setting these expectations and standards without having the required understanding of how to work effectively with players who can’t meet them (which of course occurs quite regularly).

The Foundations of Player Mental Toughness…

I often find myself saying to coaches and players that “the components of tennis mental toughness are relatively easy to understand but very hard to do”…

At it’s core player mental toughness requires simply choosing to focus on a helpful process at the beginning of the rally or point, and actually committing to actions based on that focus during the rally or point.

In this way the formula for mental toughness is Helpful Attention + Action = Mental Toughness

And the key reflection…

Players must regularly check in at the end of rallies/points and ask the following question: Did I commit my actions to my chosen attention during the rally or point?

The bottom line is that, assuming that we as coaches are helping educate players on the processes that will most help them improve (in practice) and win (in matches), the player who most frequently commits to repeating this simple formula in practice and matches will improve the most and become the most effective competitor…

So, of course, it’s super important that we encourage players to practice it..Check out the video above with USC freshman Jack Jaede to see how I tend to encourage players to practice this process…