A Simple, Time Effective Way to Develop Your Players’ Self-Awareness…

One of the most common barriers to mental toughness occurs when players become ‘caught up’ in unintentional difficult internal experiences like nerves and frustration and consequently begin taking actions based on these experiences.

To overcome this barrier players must first recognise that their actions have become dominated by these experiences…

The required skill here is self-awareness..

In this video from the Australian Open Coaches Conference I discuss the most common difficult internal experiences that players become caught up in and introduce you to a simple activity that you can do with your players to begin to enhance both their concentration and self-awareness…

Developing Player Mental Toughness: Our Most Common Mistake…

Setting high expectations and standards for players is a crucial component of any optimal developmental culture because these foundations promote quality practice environments and player self-belief. But it’s vital to match these expectations and the related challenges we set players with their ability to meet them. While some people may believe that lacking these expectations and standards as coaches (of developing players) is the most common missing ingredient to player success I beg to differ…

Most Common Coaching Mistake

In my experience, the most common mistake we make as developmental coaches is in fact setting these expectations and standards without having the required understanding of how to work effectively with players who can’t meet them (which of course occurs quite regularly).

The Foundations of Player Mental Toughness…

I often find myself saying to coaches and players that “the components of tennis mental toughness are relatively easy to understand but very hard to do”…

At it’s core player mental toughness requires simply choosing to focus on a helpful process at the beginning of the rally or point, and actually committing to actions based on that focus during the rally or point.

In this way the formula for mental toughness is Helpful Attention + Action = Mental Toughness

And the key reflection…

Players must regularly check in at the end of rallies/points and ask the following question: Did I commit my actions to my chosen attention during the rally or point?

The bottom line is that, assuming that we as coaches are helping educate players on the processes that will most help them improve (in practice) and win (in matches), the player who most frequently commits to repeating this simple formula in practice and matches will improve the most and become the most effective competitor…

So, of course, it’s super important that we encourage players to practice it..Check out the video above with USC freshman Jack Jaede to see how I tend to encourage players to practice this process…

How Fear of Failure Causes Players to Forget the Goal of Competition…

Allen Fox

For any coach wanting to better understand common underlying causes of poor player mental toughness you won’t find a more helpful source than Allen Fox…

Here, in one of my favourite articles, he explains how players drive to reduce fear of failure often causes them to forget the aim of competing – which of course is to win!

Check it out…

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